All posts by Lee Bolton

Baumann, Charlie

Card: Ultimate 1991
Acquired: TTM 1992, Patriots Blitz

I struck out badly with most of the Orlando Thunder trying to get autographs as there was a massive amount of turnover on the franchise from 1991 to 1992, so many of the WLAF ProSet cards I had were completely out of date. I got lucky when I sent a stack to the Patriots that year and Baumann was on the team.

Charlie bounced around a lot, being treated as a stop-gap by many teams before landing comfortably in Orland0- twice. From 1989 to 1991, Baumann would fail at tryouts for the Bills and Seahawks but would find a home with the Orlando Thunder in the WLAF in 1991, finishing 3rd in scoring in the fledgling league with 54 points. Charlie was solid inside the 35, but wildly inconsistent only making 2 of 7 from outside of 40 yards. When the 1991 season ended, he was signed quickly by the Dolphins who needed a quick fix to replace injured Pete Stoyanovich for a few games, but when Stoyanovich returned, Baumann would be out of a job. After losing the kicking competition to Al Del Greco in Houston, Charlie then’d sign almost immediately with the Patriots where he’d finish the season, and play through the next season before losing the kicking job to Matt Bahr. Charlie would head North of the border and play in the CFL replacing controversial Donald Igwebuike at kicker for the Saskatchewan Roughriders in 1994 and in 1996 Baumann would move to the AFL where he played for the Orlando Predators through the 1997 season.  Since retiring Baumann has earned another 2 degrees and lives comfortably in Orlando. Below are his statistics from the 1991 WLAF season.

G/GS  10/10      Pat 24/26     Fga 16     Fgm  10      Pct .625    Blk 1     lg 48

Brown, Steve

Cards: Fleer 1990, ProSet 1989
Acquired: TTM 2010, C/o The Kentucky Wildcats
Sent: 3/26        Received: 4/24  (28 days)

Drafted in the third round of the 1983 draft by the Houston Oilers, Steve Brown was considered an excellent fit for their primarily man to man defense. He’d get off to a good start in 1983 on special teams, averaging 25.6 yards per kick return and return one 93 yards for a touchdown.  He’d also get 1 interception and 2 fumble recoveries starting 10 games.  Steve played during some of the leaner years of the Oilers’ existence as a franchise, up and through the Jerry Glanville era. In both 1985 and 1989 Steve pulled down a career high 5 interceptions.  In 1990 the team went in another direction at cornerback, and while Steve suited up, he would start no games for the team and retired.

In 1995 Brown was hired as an assistant coach for the St. Louis Rams. He’d coach the cornerbacks in 1996-1997 and then the complete secondary from 1998-2000 where the team won the Superbowl. He is considered an apostle of the Dick Vermeil coaching tree.  Brown left the Rams, and in 2003 was hired by Kentucky University.  In 2007 he was promoted to defensive coordinator, where Steve installed an aggressive defense. The defensive unit responded well by improving and flourishing across the board.

G/Gs  119/96   Tac  N/a  Sac 5  Fum 5  Int 18  Yds  264  Td 1   Lg 44

Brown, Ron

Card: Score 1989 Speedburner
Acquired: In Person 1990, Dallas Cowboys Training Camp

Al Davis loves himself some speed and this is always evident in the fleet wide receivers he signs. A prime example was Plan B signee Ron Brown from the then across town Los Angeles Rams. A world class speedster that won the gold medal in the Olympics as part of a 4×100 relay that set the record with Carl Lewis, Ron would also finish fourth in the 100 meters.

Originally drafted by the Cleveland Browns, Brown ended up on the Rams in 1984, basically replacing speedster Drew Hill. He worked primarily at receiver until the following year when his skills were applied at kick returning,- a position he’d excel at averaging an incredible 32.8 yards per return and 3 touchdowns. He’d tie an NFL record with 2 kick off returns for touchdowns against Green Bay. Ron was named All Pro that season and to the Pro Bowl following the season in 1985. He continued to see success primarily as a returner from there on for the rest of his time,  and had a career high 521 yards receiving in 1987. He’d retire momentarily again in 1988 to train for the Olympics, but quickly returned to the Rams that season. Over his career he’d be an all purpose man for the Rams finishing with a bit over 5800 yards from scrimmage. He’d play one season with Al Davis and the Raiders, where they tried to convert his speed to defensive back, but again returned to the Rams in 1991, retiring at the age of 30.

G/Gs 100/32   Rec 98    Yds  1791    Avg   18.3   Td  13   Lg 65  |
Rt  199     Yds 4439     Avg 22.6       Td 4     Lg 89T