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Brown, Ron

Card: Score 1989 Speedburner
Acquired: In Person 1990, Dallas Cowboys Training Camp

Al Davis loves himself some speed and this is always evident in the fleet wide receivers he signs. A prime example was Plan B signee Ron Brown from the then across town Los Angeles Rams. A world class speedster that won the gold medal in the Olympics as part of a 4×100 relay that set the record with Carl Lewis, Ron would also finish fourth in the 100 meters.

Originally drafted by the Cleveland Browns, Brown ended up on the Rams in 1984, basically replacing speedster Drew Hill. He worked primarily at receiver until the following year when his skills were applied at kick returning,- a position he’d excel at averaging an incredible 32.8 yards per return and 3 touchdowns. He’d tie an NFL record with 2 kick off returns for touchdowns against Green Bay. Ron was named All Pro that season and to the Pro Bowl following the season in 1985. He continued to see success primarily as a returner from there on for the rest of his time,  and had a career high 521 yards receiving in 1987. He’d retire momentarily again in 1988 to train for the Olympics, but quickly returned to the Rams that season. Over his career he’d be an all purpose man for the Rams finishing with a bit over 5800 yards from scrimmage. He’d play one season with Al Davis and the Raiders, where they tried to convert his speed to defensive back, but again returned to the Rams in 1991, retiring at the age of 30.

G/Gs 100/32   Rec 98    Yds  1791    Avg   18.3   Td  13   Lg 65  |
Rt  199     Yds 4439     Avg 22.6       Td 4     Lg 89T

Albritton, Vince

Card: Topps 1990
Acquired: In Person 1991, Dallas Cowboys Training Camp

I remember at the same time I got Daryl Johnston in the autograph alleyway at St. Edwards, I was able to corral Vince for his as well almost at the same time. I think it was my second or third day there at the camp back in 1991. I can still remember the sound of their cleats as they walked up the street to the playing field.

A free agent signee from the University of Washington in 1984, Vince Albritton was a ferocious hitting strong safety who spent the majority of his career playing on special teams during his 8 year career. He’d even  make the cover of the “Dallas Cowboys Weekly” where he was referred to as “The Lethal Weapon”. During the Dallas Cowboy’s darkest hour in 1989 Vince stepped to the plate starting all 16 games for the team and notched 111 tackles, but quickly by 1990 his season was limited to 8 games due to injury. By 1991, he only suited up for 6 games and then was out of football by the end of the season.

Today Vince is a licensed plumber and recently attended the demolition of Texas Stadium, sharing his memories with public about the stadium.

G/Gs  87/27    Tac N/a    Sac 3    Fum 7
Int 1    Yds  3    Avg 3.0   Lg 3    Td 0

Cecil, Chuck

Card: Topps Stadium Club 1992
Acquired: In Person, Houston Oilers Training Camp 1995

Hard hitting Cecil came from the Cardinals to replace former defensive back Bo Orlando in 1995, and played for the Oilers for one season. He retired due to numerous concussions. After a few years away from the NFL as a color commentator at the college level, Cecil returned to the league as an assistant with the Tennessee Titans for Jeff Fisher.

In 2009, he took over for popular defensive coordinator Jim Schwartz,  while Chuck had to deal with man-mountain Albert Haynesworth jumping ship to Washington. The had a difficult year defensively as the Titans suffered a 59-0 shellacking to the New England Patriots.  Cecil later was fined $40k for being caught on camera giving the middle finger to the referees during a contested game against the Denver Broncos in 2010.

In his career, Cecil made one ProBowl while with the Packers and was a favorite of the All Madden Team. He was also recognizable for his oversized ‘Gazoo’ helmet he wore to protect against further concussions. Despite his reputation as a hard hitting free safety, Chuck did more damage to himself, sustaining bloody noses and concussions on a regular basis, all for forcing 1 fumble in 445 tackles. A 2009 College Football Hall of Fame inductee, Chuck’s 100 yard interception return was voted the greatest Wildcat play of all time.

G/Gs  95/61    Tac 445  Sac  0  FF  1
Int 16  Yds 235   Td  1  Lg 33