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Waymer, Dave (1958-1993)

Card: Action Packed 1990
Acquired: In Person 1992, Dallas Cowboys training camp

Dave Waymer was a dynamic defensive back who was drafted originally by the New Orleans Saints in the 2nd round out of  the 1980 Draft from Notre Dame. A Saints fan through and true, he’d go on to start 10 games in his rookie season recovering 2 fumbles. As Waymer’s career continued he’d become well known as a solid ball hawk on a defense that was more recognized for its linebacking corps nicknamed “The Dome Patrol”. Occasionally injuries would creep up on Waymer, but this did not stop him from creating a turnover for 12 straight seasons.  Waymer started his career at left cornerback, and then made the conversion to free safety in his final season with New Orleans in 1989. In Dave’s career in New Orleans he was able to force 37 interceptions and had 15 fumble recoveries. He’d depart via plan B to San Fransisco where he played for two additional seasons, splitting time at both strong safety and free safety and in 1992 signed with the Raiders where I got his autograph at training camp that season when the Raiders stopped in.  Waymer finished his career with 48 interceptions, 18 fumble recoveries and one ProBowl under his belt in 1987.

Dave Waymer died of a cocaine overdose in 1993. I remember when I heard the news, I was genuinely shocked. He was the first autograph of a player I had who passed away. I even had his awkward looking Starting Lineup figurine that Kenner had released a few years earlier in his Saints uniform.  A truly nice guy, I think I was the only person who recognized him and wanted his autograph.

Gs/Gp  197/155       Tac  N/a     Sac   1      Fum 18
Int   48    Yds  536     Avg  11.1          Td    0       Lg   44

Oliver, Maurice

pset91wl ma oliverCard: ProSet WLAF 1991
Acquired: In Person 1992,  San Antonio Riders v. Birmingham Fire

Drafted in the 3rd round of the positional draft by the Birmingham Fire, linebacker Maurice Oliver was overshadowed by his teammates Paul McGowan and John Brantley, but it was Maurice who’d lead the team in sacks out of the gate in 1991 with 7.

Originally a developmental squad member of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Oliver would suit up for 3 games for them before drawing the WLAF’s attention. Oliver played the 1992 season for the Fire as well where I’d get his autograph after the ending of the San Antonio Riders versus the Birmingham Fire game in which the Riders would win the hard fought contest.  In that season he’d grab another 6 sacks, finishing as the franchise leader with 13, – as after the 1992 season the league would suspend operations.

After retiring from football Maurice would go into insurance and as of this post is an agent for State Farm (www.mauriceoliver.com) in Alabama.

Games 20      Tac  N/a      Sac  13      FF N/a     Int 0     Yds 0     Avg -.-   Td 0

Thomas, Broderick ‘The Sandman’

Card: Action Packed Rookies 1990
Acquired: In Person, Dallas Cowboys Training Camp 1996

Playing outside linebacker for the Nebraska Cornhuskers during the late 80’s, Broderick Thomas garnered the nickname of “The Sandman” for his lights out sacking ability and received 2 time All America Honors. The Buccaneers took a shot at him, drafting him #5 in the monster 1989 draft. Based on his ability, statistics and attitude, this to me I thought was a sure fire pick, and the team quickly branded him as the ‘future’ in the NFL at linebacker. The bar was set up incredibly high and Broderick would have a hard time living up to those expectations starting no games his rookie season. He’d see continued improvement, with 7.5 sacks at LOLB in 1990 and a career high 11 sacks in 1991 at ROLB where he also contributed 174 tackles that season. (Playing in Tampa however he’d not see the ProBowl.) Thomas would also pull down 2 picks and a touchdown and 3 fumbles in 1992, but with his sack numbers on the downward slide, he’d see free agency after 1993 where he only started 8 games.

In 5 years with the Buccaneers, Thomas would finish with 26.5 sacks- which is probably about half of what was expected of him by the franchise. He’d continue the NFC Central tour, playing for both the Lions and Vikings respectively a season a piece and finish his career playing for the Dallas Cowboys in 1996 and 1997.  I’d get his autograph while he was with the Cowboys at training camp in 1996 where he alternated at linebacker and defensive end. In fairness to Thomas, his statistics while not amazing, were respectable enough to allow him to become a respectable linebacker. He’d retire in 1998, due to a freak injury when he ripped his ACL during training camp.

Tragically sacrificing himself for the sport, Thomas has suffered from a variety of arthritic related conditions, panic attacks, and depression- all from football- but has somehow managed to continue on. Nowadays, Broderick runs Broderick Sports Entertainment, fundraises for childhood diabetes and passionately follows everything Cornhusker related as an active alumni. Thomas is a prime example of why we must not forget our former gladiators and that life after football is not just a send off to retirement and riches without worry or pain.

G/Gs  144/96    Tac 643   Sac 47.5    Fum 15
Int  2    Yds 81     Td  1     Lg  56T