Proehl, Ricky

Card: Action Packed Rookies 1990
Acquired: 2020, Future Considerations
Failure: TTM, C/o Home 2011, 2018, 2019

I’m not really sure what’s up with Ricky Proehl. I’ve seen numerous successes for him, with some that even include the card pictured above, so after 3 failures over the years, where it looked like I was the last person out in the cold, a friend who I help out from time to time had this extra floating around that I could have. I would have liked to get Ricky on a card or two more, but after the 3rd or 4th failure- I routinely in the past look at other options, but for the time being I’ll stand pat with this one and will probably be a bit gun shy about trying him again. This card was a definite set need that I wanted to get out of the way for a while. I only got one when I broke a box years ago originally, so I’ve been out quite a few cards every time I wrote him.

Ricky Proehl gets no respect. He graduated from Wake Forest as virtually the school’s all-time leader in receiving yards (2,949 yards), and TDs (25), as well as ranking in the top five in receptions and receiving average.  He was selected in the 3rd round of the 1990 draft by the Phoenix Cardinals.

His rookie season was a solid debut, when he caught 56 passes for 802 yards and 4 TDs. These numbers were the best by a Cardinals rookie and the first to lead the team since 1950. He then played the next 3 years with the franchise, and set career marks in 1993 (65 receptions, 877 yards, and 7 TDs). Following the 1994 season, Ricky was traded to the Seattle Seahawks, where he played through 1995. In 1996, he rejuvenated his career playing with the Bears for a season, hauling down 58 receptions, for 753 yards, and 7 TDs.

In 1998, Proehl signed with the St. Louis Rams and became a member of ‘The Greatest Show on Turf’. He is perhaps best known for this time of his career, as he was clutch for the team, as a situational starter or when they needed him most. Ricky won two Super Bowls with the Rams over the next 5 seasons recording 207 catches, for 2590 yards, and 16 TDs.

At the grand old age of 35, Ricky still had a few miles left. He joined the Carolina Panthers in 2003, playing the majority of his sunset years with the squad. Over 3 seasons, he posted 1237 yards and 8 TDs for Carolina before one final season in 2006 with the Indianapolis Colts.

Ricky has been involved in coaching since retirement working with the Carolina Panthers from 2011- 2016. He also owns a sports park in North Carolina. His son, Austin followed in his footsteps and was most recently a WR for the Seattle Dragons of the XFL.

It should be noted that despite never posting a 1,000 yard season in his 17 season career, he finished with over 8,000 yards receiving in just 109 starts and recorded under 400 yards in only 5 seasons.

G/GSRECYDSAVGTDLG
244/109669887813.35478

Sherman, Richard

Cards: Panini Prestige 2015, Score 2017 Gold
Acquired: TTM 2020, C/o The San Fransisco 49ers
Sent: 9/3 Received: 10/30 (57 days)

Richard Sherman when he arrived at Stanford was actually a WR. He in fact caught 81 passes for 1340 yards and 7 TDs over his Freshman and Sophomore campaigns in 2006 and 2007. He’d switch to CB during 2009 and start climbing the depth chart. Sherman posted 113 total tackles and 6 interceptions for 82 yards and a TD. Richard was selected by the Seattle Seahawks in the 5th round of the 2011 NFL Draft.

Richard again climbed the depth chart and started 10 games his rookie year. He was named to multiple rookie teams at the end of the season. Quickly establishing himself as one of the premier defensive backs in the league, he posted 8 interceptions and 24 pass deflections (league leader) in 2012- earning his first of three consecutive All-Pro Nominations, as a member of the Seahawks secondary, the feared ‘Legion of Boom’. 2013 saw him leading the NFL in interceptions with 8, as 2014 saw him earn his final nod as teams threw away from him with regularity and respect. Richard continued to see Pro Bowl nominations through the 2016 season.

As the Legion began breaking up, Richard saw free agency in 2018. It would come as a stunner to Seahawks fans as he joined the division rival San Fransisco 49ers. He returned to Pro Bowl form in 2019 as Sherman pulled down 3 interceptions for 65 yards and a TD, along with 31 pass deflections.

I wrote Richard sort of on a whim. I had this really nice Panini Contenders card, and I stumbled over the Score card as I was thinking about it. I took it as a sign and went for it, mailing to the 49ers facility. I was very lucky to see a response in a bit under 60 days.

Clark, Bruce

Cards: Topps 1985, ProSet World League 1991, Wild Card WL 1992
Acquired: TTM 2020, 2021 C/o Home
Sent: 9/9 Received: 9/25 (16 days)
Failure: TTM 2012, C/o Home

Bruce Clark was a consensus All-American defensive end for the Penn State Nittany Lions posting 19 sacks over his college career, winning the first Lombardi Award as a Junior in 1978. Originally a linebacker who converted to defensive tackle, Bruce was not only still extremely quick after packing on the extra bulk, he was incredibly strong.

He was selected in the first round (4th overall) of the 1980 NFL Draft by the Green Bay Packers, but opted in a shocker to play in Canada instead with the Toronto Argonauts. You see, Bruce was fine playing DT or DE, but with the Packers switching to a 3-4 alignment, they had this idea that at 6’2″, 260, Clark was going to play nose. He didn’t want that, and he didn’t like how the Pack was being run from an organizational standpoint.

After two stellar seasons in the CFL, Bruce decided to play in the NFL. Reiterating his desire to play somewhere else than the ‘Siberia’ of the NFL or nose tackle, the Packers traded Bruce to the Saints for their #1 pick in the 1983 draft.


Much maligned for his surgically repaired knee coming out of Penn State, Bruce started 88 consecutive games for the Saints and was an anchor for the Saints defense at left defensive end. His best season came in 1984 when he earned his only pro bowl appearance, racking up 10.5 sacks, 2 fumble recoveries, and his only career interception. He’d join the Chiefs in 1989 for his final season, dressing for 11 contests.

Bruce opted to play in the World League of American Football in 1991 and declared for the league’s supplemental pool of eligible players and was selected in the first round by the Barcelona Dragons. As one of the oldest players in the WLAF, Bruce’s leadership and experience was appreciated by the Dragons’ defense, as he paced their solid team with 7 sacks. He opted to retire after the 1991 season.

Bruce has been on my long short list for a while, and his name popped up recently, so I was ecstatic to shoot something out to him. He signed these two cards quickly, but I had to try him again, since the sharpie quality is poor, his autograph look like it smudged slightly, and he switched out my Wild Card WL 92 for a Topps 85. Early in 2021, I decided to try again, and he graciously signed the Wild Card WL I still needed for the set.

CFL G/GsTACSACFUM
N/aN/a5
INTYDSAVGTDLG
100.000
NFL G/GsTACSACFUM
113/88N/a39.59
INTYDSAVGTDLG
199.009
WLAF G/GsTACSACFUM
10/10347.01

Celebrating the game, the players, the cards, and the autographs for over 25 years.