Tag Archives: philadelphia eagles

Jeter, Tommy

Card: Star Pics 1992
Acquired: In Person 1994, Philadelphia Eagles Training Camp

Tommy Jeter played for the Texas Longhorns during the waning days of the Southwestern Conference, (which consisted at that point of a bunch of teams from Texas after Arkansas left). He’d be drafted in the 3rd round by the Philadelphia Eagles, where I’d get his autograph in West Chester in 1995.  Although he was well sized at 6-5, 285, Jeter would rarely get playing time under Rich Kotite and Ray Rhodes, and injuries took its toll on the young defensive lineman as he spent the greater part of his final season with the Eagles on IR before being released. Jeter would then sign with the Arizona Cardinals and be cut in training camp and then end up with the Panthers before retiring in 1996.

I think I got like 14 or 15 autographs on my trip to West Chester that year. My parents felt bad because I wanted to go to the Pro Football HoF but we were unable to go even though we were in the general area.  I think the biggest haul I got from this group was Herschel Walker, but Randall Cunningham completely denied me, by dropping my card on the ground outside the fence and insisting I already got one from him, – even though I hadn’t.  Training camp there was set up much the same way as Cowboys training camp, with a long metal fence that players walked by, but a lot less fans. It was interesting too because the player’s wives came out with them too, almost like they were trying to show them off to the crowd. Tommy was a really nice guy. He saw that I was wearing my high school hat, and asked me, “What I was doing here and how was Austin?”

G/GS  32/0    Tac  15    Sac   1    FF  0     Int 0   Yds 0   Avg -.-  Td 0

Johnson, Jimmy

Cards: Proset 1989, Proset 1990, Proset 1991, Proset 1991 AP, Proset 1992
Acquired: In Person 1991,1992,1993, Dallas Cowboys Training Camp

Coach Johnson would be one of the first autographs that I’d get at training camp at St. Edwards in Austin, Tx. With his trademark hair, Jimmy has an alpha personality, loves the limelight, and signing autographs, sometimes by the dozens in his golf cart before and after practice.

Jimmy has been a winner at every level he has played at. First as a player for Arkansas 1964 National Championship team as an All American Defensive Lineman (where he was a teammate of future Dallas Cowboys owner, Jerry Jones), as a head coach at Oklahoma State, and then at the University of Miami where he guided the Hurricanes to its highest level of elite dominance from 1984-1989. The Miami Hurricanes were not without controversy. Dominating the college ranks, the Hurricanes were considered highly undisciplined off the field because Johnson encouraged the players to have a lot of swagger openly embracing the moniker of being the “Bad Boys of Football”. After his tenure with the Hurricanes ended with one national championship in 1987, Johnson would then move on to the professional ranks, hired by Jerry Jones to coach the Cowboys in 1989. (He’d finish his college coaching record at 81-34-3.)

This timing was tough for Jimmy as he was taking over for coaching legend Tom Landry.  He arrogantly proclaimed with Jones at their initial press conference that he’d have the franchise turned around in 3 seasons time- ostracizing many loyal fans who preferred the quiet, professional demeanor of Landry. After an initial extremely rough 1-15 start in 1989, Johnson would begin to right the fortunes of the Cowboys, and winning melts most resentment. By season 3 the Cowboys were back in the playoffs, and won consecutive Superbowls in 1992 and 1993. Johnson orchestrated the most lopsided trade of all time, trading runningback Herschel Walker to the Minnesota Vikings for a bevvy of draft choices and players. Jimmy had an eye for talent, and while not having the final say on all draft choices, played a large part in locating talent and underrated free agents, signing often Miami Hurricanes that he was familiar with as situational players.

After leaving the Cowboys over personal differences with once friend Jerry Jones, Jimmy briefly retired from coaching, turning to the broadcast booth. He was offered the head coaching  job for the Eagles in 1994, but declined, instead taking over for legendary Don Shula and the Dolphins in 1996, where he’d coach through the 1999 season. Although he’d guide the team to 3 playoff appearances, he’d not move beyond the divisional round and cited burn-out as his reason for retirement.

Since re-retiring Johnson has remained front and center on Fox’s NFL pregame show and the College Championship Series and owns a restaurant in Miami. An extensive coaching tree has formed from Jimmy, including Dave Wannstedt, Butch Davis, and Norv Turner. Jimmy Johnson is also the only coach to win a National Championship and the Superbowl. He’s also done a bit of bit acting, on “The Shield”, “Coach”, and “The Waterboy” and in commercials. In 2006, Johnson was linked briefly to the Houston Texans as a dark horse candidate for the open coaching job, but declined the reports as pure speculation.  Jimmy is a huge fan of the series “Survivor” and was cast in the 2010 season.

Oddly despite his accolades Jimmy has not been inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame for his coaching accomplishments with the Cowboys.

W  80     L 64    T 0       Pct .555

Archer, David

Cards: Proset 1991, Wild Card WLAF 1992
Acquired: TTM 2010, C/o Home.
Sent: 7/30  Received: 8/27    (28 days)

David Archer was signed as a free agent by the Atlanta Falcons in 1984, where he’d be the back up quarterback and starter in 1985 and 1986 until Chris Miller arrived in 1987. He’d then bounce around the NFL as the backup quarterback for the Redskins in 1988 and Chargers in 1989. He’d be cut and out of football in 1990, but was be picked up by the Eagles in 1991. It was at this point that the WLAF intervened and David Archer would have his moment in the sun when he went to play for the Sacramento Surge franchise in 1992. The Surge needed a veteran presence and a makeover to turn the franchise around from its dismal 3-7 showing of 1991 and Archer fit that bill to the T. Archer virtually went on to rewrite all the Surge records, and lead the team to World Bowl II, earning MVP honors passing 22 of 36 and 286 yards with 2 TDs as the team rallied to score 15 points in the fourth quarter. David also grabbed the single season passer rating record at 107 with a whopping 9.35 yards per completion and 29 touchdowns. Archer and the Surge were the Riders‘ nemesis in 1992, and when these two teams met it was usually a torrid match. He would lead the team in a comeback victory over the Riders in the final WLAF game at Bobcat stadium in 1992 after being snubbed in Sacramento in OT by the Riders earlier in the season.

After the folding of the WLAF, Archer played with the Eagles an additional season in 1992, and then jumped ship to the CFL USA with the Sacramento Gold Miners in 1993 and 1994, and then the Texans in 1995. He’d then play a single season for the Ottawa Rough Riders, before that franchise was disbursed in 1996. (Quite possibly there is some sort of morose record there for the most number of franchises played for that folded, as Archer had the ‘touch of death’ for 4 franchises over a 5 year period.) He’d take a season off in 1997 uninterested in playing for Saskatchewan, and then play one final season in 1998 for the Edmonton Eskimos.

Archer has since gone on to become a color commentator for the Falcons, SEC football and currently ACC football. I thought at some point I had gotten his autograph but I was completely mistaken. He signed these two cards in about a month.

WLAF
Att 317   Comp 194   Pct 61.4   Yds 2964
Td 23    Int 7   Rat 107.0   Lg 80t