Tag Archives: proset 1990

Hodson, Tom

Cards: Action Packed 1990, ProSet 1990
Acquired: TTM 1991,1992, Patriots Blitz

Tom Hodson was drafted out of LSU in the 3rd round of the 1990 draft. Hodson would be the quarterback at the helm that helped lead the Louisiana State Tigers out of the stone age and back into the modern football age. Armed with a peashooter for an arm, the Patriots needed any help that they could acquire at quarterback and started Hodson in a platoon along with Scott Zolak and Hugh Millen over a 2 year period.  He’d play in 7 games and put up almost 1,000 yards, and 4 touchdowns clocking in with a rating of 68.5.  In 1991, he’d see some game duty, but by 1992 the writing was on the wall with his decreased playing time, and at the end of the season he’d sign with the Dolphins- as the Patriots would solve their quarterback problems by drafting Drew Bledsoe. He would not play a down over the next two seasons for the Dolphins or in 1994 with the Cowboys. He’d play a bit more for the Saints but after the 1995 season, Tom would retire at the age of 28- never starting more than 6 games in any season.  Hodson now lives in Baton Rouge and has fond memories of his time in the NFL.

G/Gs  36/12     Att 174       Comp 320     Pct 54.4     Yds 1823          Td  7    Int 11   Lg 57T     Rat  64.1

Lyles, Robert

Cards: Proset 1989, Score 1990
Acquired: TTM 2010, C/o (Army Black Knights [Westpoint])
Sent:   4/3     Received: 5/7  (34 days)

In 1984 the long suffering Houston Oilers franchise drafted linebacker Robert Lyles out of TCU in the 5th round of the common draft. Over 20 linebackers were taken before undersized Lyles came off the board, including fellow linebackers Johnny Meads and John Grimsley. The Oilers aggressively were trying to address their defensive issues, and spent a whopping 10 choices on defense in the draft on that side of the ball. Lyles would be tutored at OLB by new defensive coordinator Jerry Glanville, and by 1985, the speedy linebacker secured the starting job despite being considered undersized for the job (6″-1′, 226). Over that time Lyles would display soft hands and strong coverage ability recording an interception or fumble in 6 straight seasons and in 1989 he’d record a career high 4 picks. A tough nosed player, the media could always count on Robert to fire the team up or have a quotable line. It was during the Oilers’ rise back to the playoffs, where Robert Lyles playing on special teams laid out an opposing player on the turf in furious fashion. The player laid on the turf motionless and Lyles was quoted as saying, “Welcome to the House of Pain!”  The name stuck and the Oilers kept it as part of their way of intimidating opponents and playing mind games with them.  Jerry Glanville over this period would climb into the head coaching seat of the Houston Oilers franchise, but at the end of the 1989 season resigned under fire after losing early in the playoffs to the Pittsburgh Steelers. With a new head coach in place, and a new defensive system being used (4-3), Lyles would be released by the team, but would quickly be retained by the Jerry Glanville and the Atlanta Falcons, where Robert would finish his career after the 1991 season.

After Robert’s departure from the NFL, he took up coaching and by 1994 was in the Arena Football League coaching with both the Tampa Bay Storm and the Memphis Pharaohs for a year a piece as a positional coach. In 1996, he became the Portland Forest Dragons’ defensive coordinator- a job Lyles would hold for two seasons until he’d take up the same job with the Los Angeles Avengers in 1999. He’d serve as interim head coach for 11 games in 2001, guiding the team to a 5-6 record. The team would respond by leading the AFL in variety of defensive categories. He’d then be named head coach of the Georgia Force, and then later defensive coordinator of the Grand Rapids Rampage for 2004 and 2005. Lyles would join the Black Knights staff in 2007 and has moved up to linebackers coach, where he has brought an intense and aggressive style to the double eagle flex style defense.

G/Gs 109/100    Tac  N/a    Sac 10      Fum 8     Int 10   Yds 111   Avg 11.1   Td 0    lg  48

Duncan, Curtis ‘CD’


Cards: Pacific 1991,Pinnacle 1992,Topps 1992,Topps 1988, Score 1991, Proset 1990
Acquired: In Person, 1991,1993. TTM 2010 c/o home.
Sent: 2/15   Received: 2/26  (11 days)
See Also: Curtis Duncan (2), Curtis Duncan (3)

A 10th round selection out of Northwestern, nobody really gave Curtis a chance to make the Houston Oilers’ roster in 1987 but he ended up contributing for a 7 solid seven seasons. Considered the quietest member of the Run and Shoot wide receivers, Curtis was the ‘hands man’ of the group of Ernest Givins, Haywood Jeffrires, and Drew Hill/ Webster Slaughter. Never actually going over the 1,000 yard plateau, his best season came in 1992 when he had 954 yards on 82 receptions.  He’d play out the 1993 season with the Oilers, and then play through the preseason the next year with the Packers. (Among his more notorious accomplishments is holding the NFL record for receivers of most catches without a touchdown, at 106- probably since broken.) Duncan is now a member of the Houston Texans Ambassador club- (spokesmen for the organization that appear at a variety of local events to increase public interest in the Texans) and also plays golf and writes poetry in his spare time.

When Duncan first started, he was a touchdown threat every time he touched the ball his rookie season. After his rookie season, he settled into his role as the possession receiver. By the end of his career he was more comparable to Kelvin Martin only occasionally running the deep route. CD was also pretty good on Tecmo Super Bowl. The game always had him set up to go deep and you could just bomb to him all day long.

Curtis signed four cards for me in near record time. The inscription from Matt 6:33. “But seek first his kingdom and his righteousness, and all these things will be given to you as well.”

Games 102     Rec 322    Yds 3935    Avg 12.2   Td 20   Lg 72