Tag Archives: Seattle Seahawks

Williams, Ronnie

Cards: Wild Card WLAF 1992, Ultimate WLAF 1992
Acquired: TTM 2017, C/o Home
Sent: 8/4   Received:  9/8   (35 days)
*donation enclosed

Ronnie Williams played college ball for the Oklahoma State Cowboys from 1984-1987.  Originally a quarterback, he’d be converted to wide receiver by his senior year.  Over his time at OSU Ronnie completed 264 of 349 passes, and as a Senior caught 26 passes for 304 yards and 2 TDs.

He’d sign with the San Diego Chargers as a free agent in 1988. After not being able to latch on with a team over the next few seasons, Ronnie decided to give the WLAF a shot.

Ronnie was selected in the first round of the WLAF positional draft in 1991 by the San Antonio Riders. He’d lead the team in receptions with 30 catches, and 4th in 321 yards.  In 1992 Ronnie had 20 receptions for 216 yards and 4 TDs.  Although the Riders finished with a 7-3 record, they were left looking in on the playoffs. Like the rest of the WLAF, the Riders were dissolved with the league after the season concluded. Ronnie is notable as he is the franchise’s career leader in receptions with 50.

Ronnie became one of the WLAF success stories. After the 1992 season, he signed with the Miami Dolphins.  He didn’t see the field in 1993 and was primarily used as a 3rd TE and blocker by the Dolphins over his career.  Perhaps his most memorable moment was catching his first professional TD pass, a 1 yard sneaky grab from Dan Marino during the 1994 playoffs in a win over the Chiefs (27-17). He played for the team through 1995, joining the Seattle Seahawks in 1996.  Ronnie caught his only regular season TD from Rick Mirer that year. After the season he’d retire.

Ronnie had two amazing WLAF cards that were not widely available until after the 1992 season, and I always wanted to get them signed. Plus he was a Rider. I had just barely missed him on two or three occasions, but finally got a hold of him.  I agreed to send a donation to his kids program and updated him on the status of many of his teammates.

WLAF      REC  50         YDS  537     AVG   10.7     TD  4
NFL  55/5         REC  10                 YDS   79             AVG  7.9        TD 1

 

White, LenDale ‘Smash’

Card: SPX2 2006 (265/350)
Acquired: 2016, EBay

LenDale White was part of a devastating backfield trifecta for the Tennessee Titans that included both Chris Johnson and Vince Young.  While Johnson’s skill set was of the fleet footed, and Young was always a threat to take off backyard football style after not finding a receiver, White was a pure downhill power runner.  He recorded his first 100 yard performance in 2007 against who else -but the Houston Texans. White and Johnson became known briefly as ‘Smash and Dash’.

The NFL can be a cruel place. LenDale was much maligned by the media and scouts after he declared from USC. While the weigh in and subsequent body inspections have been likened to a meat market, White did not look at his best and was essentially body shamed for it.  He had a putrid rookie season after being selected in the second round of the 2006 draft by the Titans, but turned it around with a solid 2007 campaign rushing for over 1,100 yards on 303 carries, bringing back fond memories of Eddie George with his downhill running style helping Tennessee reach the playoffs.  It’d be in 2008 that White was joined by Chris Johnson, and while White’s numbers were down, his change of pace and style allowed the Titans to frustrate opposing offenses all year long.  Briefly, the Titans success, coupled with Vince Young, eclipsed the Texans broadcasts shown locally in the Austin area, much to my chagrin. It was a dark time in Texans history.

In 2009 White got into serious shape, which may have led to his downfall. LenDale’s play style was much more akin to being a powerback. He’d just bowl over defenders to counter for his lack of elite speed. Without that, he was lost in the shuffle behind Johnson by the end of the season.  After resigning with the team in 2010, he was traded to the Seahawks, reuniting him with his college head coach Pete Carroll.  He’d be released shortly thereafter for violating a drug test, and then sign with the Denver Broncos. During a preseason game, LenDale blew out an Achillies and never recovered. He’d be released in 2011.

White is perhaps best known as being a member of USC’s back to back national championships in 2004 and 2005 alongside Reggie Bush and Matt Leinart. The team failed to score the trifecta when they were defeated in the 2006 Rose Bowl by the Texas Longhorns. LenDale can be seen in the ESPN 30 for 30 presentation Trojan War where he is interviewed about his impressions of the 2006 Rose Bowl and the USC Trojans teams of lore.  He also is an active USC Alum and can be frequently seen on the sideline during games.

LenDale is another player that you have to wonder about. He failed the NFL Combine drug test in 2006, and then again in 2010- which he was suspended for, apparently all over marijuana.

G/Gs 58/18      R 628      YDS 2349      AVG 3.7      TD 24      LG 80T
REC  42      YDS 204      AVG 4.9       TD 0      LG 15

Darboh, Amara

Card: Sage 2017 Peak Performance
Acquired: 2017, Box Breaker

Amara Darboh was selected in the 3rd round of the 2017 draft by the Seattle Seahawks.  He really didn’t catch the eye of scouts until his final year at Michigan even though he was putting up reputable numbers by his Sophomore campaign.  Darboh caught 58 passes for 727 yards and 5 TDs in 2015- his Junior year.  In 2016, Amara had 57 receptions for 862 yards and 7 TDs.  His NFL Draft profile compared him to Mohamed Sanu. Darboh’s got a good NFL build and the speed, but needs to work on separating himself from receivers at the line of scrimmage.

Amara life is a unique story.  His family fled war torn Sierra Leone and came to the states when he was just a kid. In 2015, he was made an American citizen.

You can clearly see that Sage is upping their game here with this nice glossy shot and action shot of Amara Darboh, and it’s a welcome change to the market. My only complaint is that the silver and black tend to disappear on the background a bit which contributes to a bit of eyestrain. For the longest time I looked at Darboh’s card and thought it said ‘Darbon’.