Tag Archives: ttm autograph

Brown, Eddie (U MIA-FL)

Cards: Topps 1990, Topps Stadium Club 1991
Acquired: TTM 2017, C/o Home
Sent: 10/9    Received: 12/16    (68 days)
Failure: TTM 2011, C/o Home


Eddie Brown played for the Miami Hurricanes. A two year starter in 1983 and 1984, he posted 89 receptions for 1754 yards (19.7 yards per reception) and 14 TDs. Gifted with a great skillset of speed and hands, Brown was selected with the 13th pick overall in the 1985 draft by the Cincinnati Bengals.  This draft is known for its incredibly strong wide receiver pool, which included notables such as: Jerry Rice, Andre Reed, Al Toon, Jessie Hester, Vance Johnson, Reggie Langhorne, Emile Harry, Eric Martin, and Willie Drewery.

Despite putting up solid numbers for the Bengals, Brown has always been mistreated by fans and the media outside of Cincinnati- as he was selected 3 picks before Jerry Rice. Still early on the Bengals looked like the winners as Eddie won the NFL Rookie of the Year Award, after he caught 53 passes for 942 yards and 8 TDs.  His best season came in 1988 when Eddie had a career high 53 receptions for 1,273 yards and 9 TDs- earning him his one and only Pro Bowl appearance.  (His single season 24 yards per reception average set an NFL record that still stands today.) For most of his career, Eddie’s numbers middled around 800 to 900 yards. He got really beat up over his career and retired after the 1991 season. Eddie teamed up with Tim McGee and QB Boomer Esiason and gave the Houston Oilers continual fits.

Eddie has had lingering injuries since retirement. Alarmingly, he has not been able to turn his neck since 1992 thanks in part possibly from a herniated cervical disc. He was kind enough however to sign these two cards for me, since I could find neither the ProSet 1990 or the Action Packed 1991 that I wanted to send. The Topps 1990 card is one of those oddballs. It’s a great photo of Brown- even if he’s not making the catch. Stadium Club was Topps attempt to create a premium line to keep up with the ProSets and Scores of the world. The strategy worked, and all the other brands established their own parallel premium brands to keep pace.

G/GS 102/99     REC 363    YDS  6134    AVG 16.9    TD 41   LG 86t

Henry, James

Cards: Pro Set WLAF 1991, Ultimate WLAF 1992
Acquired: TTM 2017, C/o Work
Sent: 11/15       Received: 12/7   (22 days)
Failure: 2017, C/o Home


James Henry went to college at Southern Mississippi. A dangerous punt returner and defensive back, he had 23 punt returns for 399 yards and 2 TDs his senior year. Over his college career James had 8 punt returns for touchdowns.  Selected in the 4th round of the talent laden 1989 draft by the Seattle Seahawks, James failed to make the squad both in ’89 and ’90.  He also briefly played for the Saskatchewan Roughriders.

Henry was selected in the 8th round of the WLAF positional draft in 1991. He played both defensive back and punt returner for the Birmingham Fire. His 10.7 punt return yard average was second in the league, and a 50 yard punt return for a touchdown in a 28-7 win over the Skyhawks.  Despite the Fire’s deep secondary, James contributed with 2 interceptions- including a 77 yarder he returned for a TD against the Thunder.

James returned to the Fire for 1992. but was unable to duplicate his success from the previous year as teams were aware of how dangerous he was in the open field. He finished with 14 punt returns for 47 yards.

During one of those games in 1992, I’d corral most of the defensive secondary and have them pen their autographs on their cards. James eluded me essentially for 25 years.  With James Henry’s autograph, I am now just down to one player from the Birmingham Fire’s ProSet WLAF set- Kenny Bell. I thought I had found Henry earlier this year via Spokeo and cross referencing his information with his trading cards, but the address in Mississippi never responded. Mark (Mark’s Signing Bonus) and I have collaborated on addresses of players from the WLAF. He got a hit from Henry and passed the information along to me. I was very happy that this worked out.

WLAF    INT 2         YDS   83         AVG  41.5        TD 1        LG 77t
PR   37           YDS  294              AVG   7.9      TD 1        LG 50t

Parcells, Bill ‘Big Tuna’

 


pset90 SBXXV B
Cards: ProSet 1990 Super Bowl Card, Action Packed 1991 All Madden Team
Acquired: TTM 2015, C/o Home
Sent: 11/12    Received: 12/3   (18 days)

Bill Parcells is one of the more memorable coaches in NFL history. Not only was he an excellent orchestrator of coaches and evaluator of talent, he was quite the personality during press conferences.

Bill Parcells was actually selected in the 7th Round of the 1964 NFL Draft by the Detroit Lions, but he was cut before he played a single game, so he almost immediately hopped into coaching (at Hastings) after graduating from Wichita State. He coached linebackers at Hastings, Wichita State and then later at Army before being promoted to defensive coordinator at Army in 1968. In 1970 he returned to coaching linebackers with Florida State, and the later Vanderbilt and Texas Tech, before taking his first head coaching job with Air Force in 1978.

Parcells briefly took a job as the defensive coordinator for the Giants under Ray Perkins in ’79- but quit the job.  He returned to coaching the following year as linebacker coach for the Patriots in 1980. It wasn’t that long thereafter before he returned to the Giants as their defensive coordinator and linebackers coach in 1981.  He converted the defensive alignment to a 3-4 and succeeded Ray Perkins as HC in 1983. After a bumpy start and being on the hot seat, Parcells righted the ship and led the Giants back to the playoffs. In 1986 the Giants won their first Superbowl (XXI), as New York posted their best franchise record (14-2) led by their stellar defense and Phil Simms. The NFC East at the time was the Dallas Cowboys, New York Giants, Philadelphia Eagles, the Cardinals, and the Washington Redskins. While the Cowboys were in a steep decline and the Cardinals were rarely a threat, the Giants had a rough and tumble time with both the Redskins and Eagles. It took another 4 years, but in 1990 the Giants returned to the Super Bowl (XXV) in a game considered to be one of the most exciting in NFL history. The Giants defeated the Buffalo Bills 20-19 led by stellar defensive play and a plodding offense that soaked up the clock led by grizzled veteran RB Ottis Anderson. Parcells retired after the game, citing health reasons.

Briefly Bill did sportscasting with NBC from 1991-1992, but was chomping at the bit to return to the game. In this phase of his coaching career, Parcells became known as a rags to riches coach. He came in and immediately turned around the fortunes of the franchises he coached. It can be attributed to Parcells for fixing the Patriots, restoring the franchise to respectability, and beginning the dynasty that has lasted into today. He coached for the Patriots from 1993 to 1996, with the team appearing in Super Bowl XXI- a loss to the Green Bay Packers. The following season Bill joined the New York Jets thanks in part to disagreements with the Patriots owner Robert Kraft over front office decisions. The Jets had to pay the Patriots a king’s ransom in draft picks to get him in the end, but Bill proved to be worth the price, turning around the moribund Jets. (In 1998 the Jets finished with a 12-4 record but lost in the AFC Championship.) He retired again from coaching in 1999.

Jerry Jones was desperate to fix the Dallas Cowboys who were beginning to become the laughing stock of the NFC East. Three consecutive 5-11 seasons were enough for Jones to approach Parcells hat in hand to lure him out of retirement. Bill’s price for Jones was steep: Head coach and general manager and no interference from Jones. The year was 2003. As with his previous stops, Bill had the magic touch leading the Cowboys to the playoffs, but over the next few years, he just couldn’t get Dallas over the hump. Before the 2007 season, Bill retired for the 3rd time.

He briefly did studio analysis for ESPN, but was lured out of retirement for a 4th time by the Miami Dolphins into an executive role at the end of 2007. As in the past, Bill fixed the Dolphins, cutting fan favorites, signing stacks of cheap free agents, firing coaches, bringing back into the fold mercurial RB Ricky Williams, and Miami responded with an 11-5 record. He retired, presumably for a final time in 2010.

Bill has an extensive coaching tree, and was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2013.  He lives in Florida and does some volunteer consulting from time to time. Currently he is retired… or is he mulling another comeback?

W 183      L   138     T 1       PCT .570