Tag Archives: upper deck legends 1997

Hornung, Paul ‘Golden Boy’


Card: Upper Deck Legends 1997
Acquired: TTM 2018 C/o Home
Sent:  3/12  Received:  3/23   (11 days)
* Donation Enclosed


While at Notre Dame from 1954 to 1956, Paul Hornung played quarterback for the Fightin’ Irish.  Over 3 years he threw for 1696 yards on 110 of 233 passes, with 12 TDs to 23 interceptions. A gifted runner, Hornung had 209 carries for 1051 yards and 6 TDs. Now during those years, passing was still in the stone age, so those totals were actually pretty substantial. Despite playing for a losing team in ’56, Hornung rushed for 420 yards and 6 TDs, while passing for 917 yards and 3 TDs, earning him the 1956 Heisman Trophy Award.

Paul was the first overall pick of the Green Bay Packers during the 1957 Amateur Football Draft.  The Packers liked Hornung’s rushing style so they converted him to a ‘back. Now the reason I use the eponymous term ‘back’ is because Paul saw time at fullback, halfback, – something called ‘L-back’ and heck, he even did some kicking duties over the next 10 seasons. Arguably his best year came in 1960, a year in which he led the league with 13 rushing TDs, 15 total touchdowns, 41 extra points, and 15 field goals. While he did not play in Super Bowl I, Paul culminated his career by earning the first Super Bowl ring.  His number was unofficially retired in 1967 by the Packers.

The Golden Boy culminated his career by being inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1985 and the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1986.  He is the only player to win the Heisman, be selected overall number 1 in the NFL draft, and win a Super Bowl, in the history of the sport.

All around high marks for this solid looking card. Upper Deck really hit the nail on the head in 1997 with this set. It did it all and it became an instant classic. This overall impressive photo of Hornung is only complimented by his autograph- something that I got lucky on getting in such pristine condition. Not only does Hornung’s autograph tend to get rushed and sloppy looking from what I’ve seen, he sent this one back in my unsealed SASE. Still for a mere $10 getting a Hall of Famer, a number one overall pick, AND a Heisman winner on a card is a bargain.

G/Gs 104/90   Rush 893   Yds 3711    Avg 4.2    TD 50   LG 72
Rec 130    Yds 1480    Avg 11.4    TD 12   LG 83
Att 55    Cpd 24    Yds 383   Pct 43.6    Td 5    Int 4    Rat 67.5
XPA 194    XPM 190    FGA  140   FGM 66    PCT 47.1    LG 52

Trumpy, Bob

Cards: Topps 1970, Upper Deck Legends 1997
Acquired: TTM 2018, C/o Home
Sent:  1/2/2018        Received: 3/8/2018   (60 days)

A Cincinnati legend, Bob Trumpy is a great example of the early AFL/ NFL reaching for a player whose primary sport was basketball. A surprise 12th round pick of the expansion Cincinnati Bengals in 1968, Trumpy didn’t have that much in the way of stats.  He played for Illinois in 1964 as a wide receiver. – There he had 28 receptions for 428 yards and 2 TDs, and then later In 1966 he played one additional year at Utah catching 9 passes for 159 yards and 2 TDs.

Trumpy had 2 things really going for him from the get go. First, he was an imposing specimen at 6’6″, 230, and secondly, the Bengals expansion franchise was pretty well stocked with veterans, so everyday Bob had to go out there and impress people.  Bob played 10 seasons for the Bengals putting together solid numbers during the ‘dead ball’ era of football. He’d earn 4 Pro Bowl nominations (1968, 1969, 1970, and 1973), and one All Pro nod in 1969- his best season as a pro when he had 37 receptions for 835 yards and 9 touchdowns, including an 80 yard strike. He’d retire after the 1977 season, but find his calling quickly in broadcasting.

Cincinnati loved Trumpy- so much so that he became a mainstay radio personality. Later Bob moved onto the national stage as a network color man. That’s where I became familiar with ol’ Trumpy. He did great color work during the ’80s for the then AFC Central on NBC Sports. Frequently Bob would call a play before it’d happen, or mention that some player hasn’t caught a pass in 6 games and is over due, and then all of a sudden the quarterback would throw a completion towards that overlooked player. He really was a marvel to listen to, and was especially in his element when paired up with Don Criqui or Dick Enberg.

A few months ago, I happened to catch an old rebroadcast of the infamous 1988 Wild Card Playoff slugout between the Cleveland Browns and Houston Oilers. The aforementioned team was assigned announcing and color duties and the game would end up going down in infamy. As the antics of Jerry Glanville went into overdrive, this game proved to be the final game of the Schottenheimer Era in Cleveland. It was an amazing game full of heroes, villains, and a pulse pounding finale. To this day, I still remember the game and consider it an epitome of a sports classic from the old rough and tumble of the AFC Central.

Bob continued in broadcasting for many years and in 2014 was awarded the Pete Rozelle Radio- Television award for outstanding longtime contributions to TV in radio in the realm of professional football, by the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

G/Gs 128/121        Rec 298      Yds 4600      Avg 15.4       TD 35    Lg 80T

Moore, Lenny

Cards: Upper Deck Legends 1997, Crown Royale Majestic 2010 (291/299)
Acquired: TTM 2017, C/o Home
Sent: 1/30    Received: 2/9    (10 days)*
* Donation Enclosed

Halfback Lenny Moore was selected in the first round of the 1956 draft by the Baltimore Colts out of Penn State.  After earning Rookie of the Year honors, he’d go on to play 12 seasons in the NFL from 1956 to 1967.  Moore was simply one of the best players during his era, but because of the 12-14 game schedule, his numbers weren’t completely eye popping. What was eye popping was his insane yards per carry. Over his career Lenny averaged 7.0 yards or more (minimum 82 carries) 3 times (1956, 1958, and 1961). Not only was Moore a hard to tackle runner, he caught 40 passes or more in 5 of his seasons, averaging a healthy 16.6 yards over his career.  As one of Johnny Unitas’ pass catchers, Moore displayed his terrific hands and ability to work in traffic, posting over 725 yards receiving 5 times (1957-1961) over his career including a then NFL positional record 938 yards in 1958, and 936 yards in 1960.

Lenny endured the growing pains of NFL offenses switching positions from right halfback to flanker and back to primary halfback over his long and storied career.  From 1963 to 1965, Moore scored a TD in a record 18 consecutive games.

Arguably the best game of his career was during his rookie season when Lenny rushed 13 times for 185 yards and 2 TDs in a win over the Green Bay Packers.  To top his career off Moore earned All-Pro Honors from 1958-1961, and again in 1964, when he won comeback player of the year honors after scoring 19 TDs.

Lenny was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1975. Moore graciously signs for fans for a nominal signing fee of 10.00 per card.  The Upper Deck 1997 Legends set is a timeless set, but I thought the Majestic had a nice composition to it. Lots of space available to frame an autograph, and the patch element was a nice piece of memorabilia to boot.

G 143       RUSH 1069      YDS 5174      AVG 4.8      TD 63      LG 79
REC 363     YDS 6039      AVG 16.6      TD 48      LG 82
KR  49          YDS 1180      AVG 24.1      TD 1         LG  92T
PR  14          YDS 56            AVG 4.0          TD 0        LG 15