Tag Archives: San Diego Chargers

Boston, David

Card: Topps 2002
Acquired: Future Considerations, 2016

At Ohio State, Boston was head and shoulders above the competition. He set school records as a receiver, and his 1998 was among the best single season marks in Buckeye history (85 catches, 1435 yards and 13 TDs.  After 3 years at Ohio State, Boston decided to declare for the 1999 NFL draft.  The 1999 draft was pretty star studded.  David was the second receiver taken off the board overall (behind Torry Holt) with the 8th pick overall by the Arizona Cardinals.

After a not so convincing rookie season (40 receptions, 473 yards, 2 TDs in 8 starts), David really took off in 2000. He put up 71 receptions for 1156 yards and 7 TDs. He followed his second season in the NFL with a dominant 2001 campaign earning his only probowl and All-Pro Nomination with 98 receptions for 1598 yards and 8 TDs. He’d be the second youngest receiver ever to break the 1,500 yard plateau. Before he could continue his career march towards stardom further, he blew out his knee after 8 games. The tragedy of it is, that David has really worked on becoming not only more disciplined as a player with his routes, but also disciplined mentally- not drawing the unsportsmanlike conduct penalties and the self-destructive behavior that plagued him early in his career. It was also a contract year…

Arizona couldn’t match San Diego’s offer to David Boston- who had become so lean and mean looking, he should’ve been playing tight end or linebacker instead of wide receiver. The guy was a walking 8 pack with 21-inch biceps! The Chargers deal was a mega contract at $47 million over 7 years.  Who knows why things didn’t workout in San Diego, but the Chargers jettisoned him just after one season (70 catches for 900 yards, and 7 TDs) in 2003. It has been rumored that the Chargers didn’t like David’s work ethic or his attitude- but regardless, he was traded to the Dolphins in 2004, in the midst of a spate of legal issues.

Boston was ready for a clean start in Miami, but then was suspended for 4 games because of steroids, and soon thereafter he tore some knee ligaments ending his season.  He returned to play briefly in 2005, but tore his knee ligaments again. In 2006 he joined the Buccaneers, however before the season began he was arrested for a DUI and GHB. Tampa quickly cut him.  David attempted to resurrect his career in 2008 in the CFL with the Toronto Argonauts, but a stress fracture in his foot ended his career after just one game.

Lance hit up a boat show from what I remember and David Boston along with a few other random players were at this event. I had always wanted Boston on a card or two. His history as a physical specimen and his subsequent burnout of the league has always fascinated me.

G/GS 75/61    REC  315     YDS  4699    AVG  14.9    TD 25    LG 70T

Johnson, Gus

sage15 gjohnsonCard: Sage 2015 (#61/250)
Acquired: 2016, Hobby Box Break

Gus Johnson was an intriguing prospect out of Stephen F. Austin. In 2014, he added the Southland Conference Player of the Year honors to his impressive resume, which also included being a 3 time All-Southland Conference selection. A bowlegged and stout runningback (5’10”, 215), Gus was a gritty player who has a nice, deceptive burst at the second level.  He finished his career with the Lumberjacks with 631 carries for 3892 yards and 51 TDs. Gus also had 57 receptions for 417 yards and a TD. He went unselected in the 2015 draft.

After a brief stay on the Falcons, Gus signed with the  Dallas Cowboys.  The Cowboys were reloading at runningback after the sudden departure of DeMarco Murray. Gus led the Cowboys in the preseason in rushing, but confident in the stable of Darren McFadden, Joseph Randle, and Lance Dunbar, they opted to cut Johnson.  He was signed to the practice squad, and then cut later in the month. Gus quickly signed with the Atlanta Falcons and was placed on their practice squad. He remained with the Falcons through mid-2016. Afterwards Gus has spent time on a variety of rosters around the league including the Chargers, Falcons (2nd time), Chargers (2nd time), and finally the Steelers. He is currently a free agent.

Little, Larry

Cards: ProSet WLAF 2014 hack, Majestic 2010
Acquired:  TTM 2017, C/o Home
Sent: 5/31    Received: 7/14      (43 days)

I remember vividly back when the Riders played the Glory, how the fans swarmed Larry for his autograph. The former NFL Great guard was kind and signed as much as he could after the game. Little was one of the few black head coach at the professional level of football in many years, and it was a big deal- even if it was the WLAF in 1992.  While the Glory finished with a dismal 1-9 record, the team was competitive in many contests. While Wild Card and Ultimate both contributed cards to the World League family in 1992, none outside of ProSet made any cards that showcased coaches- and ProSet bailed out on the WLAF market by 1992, so I made my own.

Larry played offensive line in college at Bethune-Cookman, but was not drafted in 1967. (It’s not known whether it was an issue of scouting or lack of film, but it was obvious that Larry was overlooked not only by the NFL but the AFL as well.) He’d sign as a free agent with the San Diego Chargers of the AFL. In 1969 Larry was traded to the Miami Dolphins where he quickly distinguished himself.  Larry was a key cog of the Miami Dolphins 1970’s dynasty, blocking up front for Jim Kiick, Mercury Morris, and Larry Czonka. He’d be named to the Pro Bowl 5 times (1969, 1971-1974,) and earn All-Pro 5 times (1971-1975) over his career.

After retiring from the NFL in 1980, Larry coached at his Alma Mater Bethune-Cookman from 1983-1991, before joining the WLAF with the Ohio Glory. Little was primarily known as a player’s coach. He returned to college after the WLAF went on hiatus, and coached at North Carolina Central from 1993-1998.

He’s earned numerous accolades from his playing career as well, being named to the NFL 1970s All-Decade Team, the Miami Dolphins Honor Roll, the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1993, and The Sporting News 100 Greatest Football Players in 1999.

Larry signed these 2 cards for me through the mail. I should’ve actually included the Ultimate WLAF Ohio Glory Checklist but, maybe that’s for another time. I sent him the rest of the WLAF cards that I made for him to keep and he returned two of them, one inscribed with 17-0 and the other with HOF 1993.  The photo is of him from his interview with the WLAF Gameday Magazine from 1992 and it makes a solid, if not stoic impression of the former Glory coach. I really have warmed up to the Crown Royale Majestic line of cards from 2010.  While the card is very busy design-wise, it almost has a carnival appeal to me, emphasized by the typeface used for Majestic. How Majestic is lined up and off center within the marquee drives me a bit nuts, but otherwise the patch and autograph tie up this card nicely.

G/GS  183/157