Tag Archives: toronto argonauts

Williams, Trey

Cards: Panini Contenders 2015, Crown Royale 2015, Panini Prestige 2015, Topps AAF 2019, Topps AAF 2019 NOW, Topps XFL 2020, Topps XFL 2020 Certified
Acquired: COMC, 2020. EBay, 2020. TTM C/o Home 2020
Sent: 11/12 Received: 11/21 (9 days)

Trey Williams hails from Texas A&M- a school full of rich history in producing runningbacks. While playing for the Aggies, he ran 204 time for 1343 yards and 18 TDs in 3 years (2012-2014). What was most impressive was his gaudy 6.6 yards per carry. He also caught 38 passes for 330 yards and a TD as well. Although he had a solid combine, Williams ultimately was not selected in the 2015 draft.

He’d sign with his hometown Houston Texans after the draft, then quickly join the Washington Redskins, Dallas Cowboys, the Patriots, the Dolphins, and finally the Colts- all before 2015 came to a close. After being cut by the Colts in mid-2016, Trey kept hustling. He signed with the Steelers early in 2017, then briefly joined the Argos in the CFL. In November of 2017, Williams signed with the Dallas Cowboys again where he’d be waived in final cuts during 2018.

I can’t imagine how frustrating it would be to have highlight film that made preseason sportscenter.. such as scoring a TD on his first ever preseason carry from 20+ yards out, or returning a punt for a 64 yard TD with the Steelers- but somehow miss out on making the squad.

Trey opted to head to the new frontier of the Alliance of American Football in 2019. He’d be assigned to the San Antonio Commanders. After missing the first two weeks of the season for personal reasons, Trey played in the next 6 finishing with 40 carries for 205 yards and a TD. He’d also catch 9 passes for 71 yards and a TD as well.

An exciting sparkplug, Williams provided a change of pace to lead back Kenneth Farrow II in the Commanders backfield. An outside the tackles kind of guy, Williams is very good at dodging people in space. This makes him quite effective at screen passes and out in the flat. He quickly became my favorite player just behind Greg Ward Jr.

His finest moment in the AAF came in Week 7 against the formidable Salt Lake City Stallions. The Stallions had a very stubborn defense. After trading field position for most of the game and keeping it close, QB Marquise Williams dropped a screen pass out to Trey. He bobbed and weaved through the SLC defense 36 yards and then dove into the endzone for a TD. It was really incredible to watch!

After the AAF folded, Trey joined the XFL 2020, where he was the first player selected in the open portion of the draft by the Seattle Dragons. He’d be reunited with his coach from the Commanders, Mike Riley, and a bevvy of former teammates including Kenneth Farrow. He ran 34 times for 122 yards and a TD for the Dragons, and catch 8 passes for 44 yards and a TD- before the league folded after week 5.

I first missed out on an in person signing in Houston during 2019. I would’ve driven there just to get his autograph on a bunch of cards and meet him, but I had been to in person events frequently that year, and I did not wish to antagonize my wife. I also had the Topps AAF Now card I was worried about risking, so these just sat, and then I added a few more to the stack including the XFL card.

After a while I just decided to buy a few certified cards of Trey, thinking I’d call it a day, but a few months later my partner in crime, Mark, acted on an address I had long suspected of being Trey’s- and hit pay dirt. It took me a bit to get back to Trey. I miss the Commanders and the AAF a lot, but frankly, we all know it wouldn’t have made it probably through 2020 – because of the pandemic. (See the XFL 2020.) Still after being stuck in the mud the last few months on AAF/XFL send outs, I went back to it taking the risk that Trey would ink these cards. I would have preferred a different color than silver- but I can’t look this gift horse in the mouth.

Clark, Bruce

Cards: Topps 1985, ProSet World League 1991, Wild Card WL 1992
Acquired: TTM 2020, 2021 C/o Home
Sent: 9/9 Received: 9/25 (16 days)
Failure: TTM 2012, C/o Home

Bruce Clark was a consensus All-American defensive end for the Penn State Nittany Lions posting 19 sacks over his college career, winning the first Lombardi Award as a Junior in 1978. Originally a linebacker who converted to defensive tackle, Bruce was not only still extremely quick after packing on the extra bulk, he was incredibly strong.

He was selected in the first round (4th overall) of the 1980 NFL Draft by the Green Bay Packers, but opted in a shocker to play in Canada instead with the Toronto Argonauts. You see, Bruce was fine playing DT or DE, but with the Packers switching to a 3-4 alignment, they had this idea that at 6’2″, 260, Clark was going to play nose. He didn’t want that, and he didn’t like how the Pack was being run from an organizational standpoint.

After two stellar seasons in the CFL, Bruce decided to play in the NFL. Reiterating his desire to play somewhere else than the ‘Siberia’ of the NFL or nose tackle, the Packers traded Bruce to the Saints for their #1 pick in the 1983 draft.


Much maligned for his surgically repaired knee coming out of Penn State, Bruce started 88 consecutive games for the Saints and was an anchor for the Saints defense at left defensive end. His best season came in 1984 when he earned his only pro bowl appearance, racking up 10.5 sacks, 2 fumble recoveries, and his only career interception. He’d join the Chiefs in 1989 for his final season, dressing for 11 contests.

Bruce opted to play in the World League of American Football in 1991 and declared for the league’s supplemental pool of eligible players and was selected in the first round by the Barcelona Dragons. As one of the oldest players in the WLAF, Bruce’s leadership and experience was appreciated by the Dragons’ defense, as he paced their solid team with 7 sacks. He opted to retire after the 1991 season.

Bruce has been on my long short list for a while, and his name popped up recently, so I was ecstatic to shoot something out to him. He signed these two cards quickly, but I had to try him again, since the sharpie quality is poor, his autograph look like it smudged slightly, and he switched out my Wild Card WL 92 for a Topps 85. Early in 2021, I decided to try again, and he graciously signed the Wild Card WL I still needed for the set.

CFL G/GsTACSACFUM
N/aN/a5
INTYDSAVGTDLG
100.000
NFL G/GsTACSACFUM
113/88N/a39.59
INTYDSAVGTDLG
199.009
WLAF G/GsTACSACFUM
10/10347.01

Clark, Robert

Cards: Skybox 1992, GameDay 1992, ProSet 1990
Acquired: TTM 2020, C/o Home
Sent: 4/21 Received: 6/11 (51 days)

The holder of 34 individual player records at WR for North Carolina Central at the time of his departure in 1986, Robert Clark was a 10th round pick of the New Orleans Saints in 1987. He’d make the squad, and play for the team in both 87 and 88, finishing with 22 receptions for 283 yards and 2 TDs, but couldn’t crack the starting lineup, thanks in part to an injury he sustained his rookie season.

In 1989 the Lions were fully committed to their Silver Stretch offense, so they needed 4 wide receivers to make that happen. They’d run out and sign Robert as an unconditional free agent, and he’d step right into the starting lineup posting a gaudy 18.2 receiving average, as he finished second on the team with 748 yards on 41 receptions.

Robert finished second on the team with 52 receptions and led the squad with 8 TD receptions in 1990. In 1991, Robert continued his consistent production, setting a career single game high catching 10 passes for 143 yards against the Packers, where 9 of 10 of those receptions went for first downs. He’d conclude the 1991 season with 47 catches for 640 yards and 6 TDs.

A precise route runner who is quick in traffic, Clark was fearless over the middle, but could also turn on the jets when it counted- particularly against division opponents. Over his time in Detroit, Robert started 45 of 46 contests. He’d then spend one largely forgettable season with the Dolphins in 1992, catching just 3 passes for 52 yards.

As the CFL invaded the USA in 1993, Robert joined the league playing for the Toronto Argonauts. He immediately established himself as one of the top dogs in the CFL, leading wide receivers at the midway point in receptions and yardage. On the season, Clark finished with 50 receptions for 900 yards and 3 TDs. He’d then spend his next two final seasons with the Baltimore Stallions helping the team win the CFL championship.

I have always been a friend to the Run N Shoot system, partially due to my Houston roots, so I was very happy to get his autograph on these cards, especially considering he’s such a rare signer.

NFL G/GsRECYDSAVGTDLG
67/45165264416.01869
CFL G/GsRECYDSAVGTDLG
89159117.9564