Tag Archives: san fransisco 49ers

Young, Charlie

Card: Ultimate World League 1992
Acquired: TTM 2020, C/o Home
Sent: 1/15/20 Received: 5/2/20 (108 days)
Failure: 2019, C/o Stanford (RTS)

Charlie Young played ball for the Stanford Cardinal where mixed time between runningback and receiver from 1987 to 1990. In 1987 he posted 17 receptions for 246 yards and a TD, while rushing 37 times for 130 yards and another TD. He also returned 17 kicks for 336 yards. He’d be moved to WR for 1988, and have a pretty solid campaign, catching 43 passes for 560 yards and 2 TDs. After his 1989 season was washed due to injury, he saw sparse playing time in 1990 accumulating 233 yards from scrimmage. Charles was not selected in the 1991 NFL Draft, and subsequently did not make the roster of the Raiders.

Charlie was selected by the in the 7th round of the 1992 World League Draft. He’d split time between the London Monarchs and the Montreal Machine that season rushing 50 times for 147 yards and a TD. He’d be a valuable stop valve with the Machine catching 22 passes for 203 yards and a 30 yard TD. (For purposes of the team histories however- he’s classified with the team his card pictures him with.)

After the league reorganized, Charlie returned stateside where he bounced around between squads. He’d see time with the Giants and 49ers in 1992, and the Raiders in 1993. Charlie then returned to the World League in 1995 after it reorganized, playing for the Rhein Fire, rushing for 44 yards and a TD while catching 11 passes for 125 yards. He also spent a small amount of time returning kicks during his world tour, accounting for some 180 yards on 12 returns.

Charlie has put his economics degree/ MBA to good work since his playing days, and after a tour on the board at Stanford, resides in Illinois where he is involved in real estate.

I had been on the hunt for Charlie for quite a while, but with such a common name I couldn’t just look in the phone book. It took an article on Charlie’s work for Stanford to pop up, so I wrote him C/o the university. They responded by giving me his forwarding address. I quickly gave up on this request, but lo and behold after about 3 months, he wrote me back with a nice thank-you card.

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1992501472.91N/A
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199517442.519
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Martz, Mike

Card: Topps AAF 2019 Certified
Acquired: EBay, 2020

An offensive mastermind, Mike Martz has had a career in coaching that has lasted nearly 50 years, in stops through college and the pros. He’d make his mark after joining the Los Angeles Rams in 1992 as a quarterbacks coach, and after the franchise moved to St. Louis in 1995, he moved to coach the wide receivers. After a brief stay with the Redskins in 97 and 98, Martz returned to the Rams, as the franchise’s offensive coordinator in 1999 as they won Super Bowl XXXIV over the Tennessee Titans- with ‘The Greatest Show on Turf’.

“He was by far the smartest football mind I’ve ever been around. The things he was teaching was so far ahead of what others were teaching.”

– Rams QB Marc Bulger

In 2000, Mike would replace retiring Dick Vermeil as head coach, but the Rams failed to return to the Super Bowl, losing in the wild card to the Saints. Martz’s Rams rebounded in a big way in 2001, posting a 14-2 record and returning to the Super Bowl, but ultimately losing to the New England Patriots on a last second field goal. Mike coached with the Rams through 2005 and finished with a 53-32 record. His teams made the playoffs 4 times and finished in either first or second place every season.

Mike since then has coached with the Lions, 49ers, and Bears, as an offensive coordinator. He semi-retired from the sport in 2012, working as an analyst and occasional NFLPA Collegiate Bowl coach, before deciding to give it another shot in 2018.

Mike joined the Alliance of American Football in 2018, where he was hired to coach his hometown San Diego Fleet.

“It didn’t make any difference whether I was in high school. That’s what you do. You walk onto the practice field, and that’s who you are, that’s what you are. I can’t stop and go. That’s just where it is. To be any different would cheat these players. I love this game. I wouldn’t disrespect it by not being intense.”

-Mike Martz

Mike led the Fleet to a 3-5 record, dogged by quarterback issues. Still there were shades of the mad genius coming through with the Fleet as they finished second in total yards (2,649 yards), passing yards (1,798), and 4th in rushing (851 yards).

As previously discussed, AAF certified autographs from coaches are severely overpriced. Thankfully with all the XFL hoopla this autographed card snuck under the EBay radar set with a low bid. Typically Martz’s certifieds have floated around anywhere between 30-75 dollars. I think I sniped this one out under 10. It was doubly happy to nab this one, as Mike is not a great signer through the mail.

Mike was within two feet in the visitors’ endzone coaching his quarterbacks before the Fleet’s opener, but feeling his intensity, I chickened out on chatting it up with him or asking for his autograph. Charlie Ebersol came up to Mike and chatted with him about the league before they shuffled off to another drill.

Lowry, Alan

Cards: UT Upper Deck 2011, UT Upper Deck 2011 National Champs
Acquired: TTM 2019, C/o Home
Sent: 10/3/19 Received: 4/18/20 (196 days)

Alan Lowry played for the Longhorns from 1970 to 1972 as a quarterback, punter, and defensive back. Initially a defensive back and punter when he arrived, Lowry had 3 picks in 1970, and then followed it up in 1971 with 5 interceptions for 121 yards and 2 TDs (single season school record since tied) earning him All-SWC honors. As a punter in both years Alan had 53 punts for 2,032 yards (38.3) in 1970, and 49 punts for 1,878 yards (38.3)- respectively in 1970 and 1971. His 82 yard punt, still stands as a school record.

In 1972 Alan switched to quarterback, where at the time the Longhorns were using a modified version of the Houston Veer. He rushed for 661 yards on 168 yards scoring 11 times while passing for 766 yards and a TD on 46 completions (39.3 completion percentage). Again he’d be named to the All-SWC team- but at a second position, which is a rarity even in college football.

Alan was drafted in the 13th round of the 1973 NFL Draft by the New England Patriots, but before he even played a down, he was diagnosed with blood clots from a strained tendon in his arm. The injury was serious enough to end his pro football career before it even began.

Lowry went right into coaching at Texas, with the Longhorns as a graduate assistant and then later, Wyoming and West Virginia, and later returning to Texas with the Dallas Cowboys organization. He has embarked on a long and storied career as a positional and special teams coach throughout the NFL since the early 80s, with the Cowboys, Buccaneers, 49ers, Oilers, and Titans. He is perhaps most quietly known as the architect behind the ‘Music City Miracle’ play. Lowry was with the Titans organization through 2013, and still resides in Tennessee to this day.